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Modern English doesn`t have much correspondence, although it`s there. Languages cannot have a conventional agreement at all, as in Japanese or Malay; barely one, as in English; a small amount, as in spoken French; a moderate amount, such as in Greek or Latin; or a large quantity, as in Swahili. In standard English, for example, you can say I am or it is, but not „I am“ or „it is.“ This is because the grammar of the language requires that the verb and its subject coincide personally. The pronouns I and him are respectively the first and third person, just as the verbs are and are. The verbage form must be chosen in such a way as to have the same person as the subject, unlike the fictitious agreement based on meaning. [2] [3] In American English, for example, the expression of the United Nations is treated as singular for the purposes of concordance, although it is formally plural. Such a concordance is also found with predictors: man is tall („man is great“) vs. the chair is large („the chair is large“). (In some languages, such as German. B, that is not the case; only the attribute modifiers show the agreement.) Case agreement is not an essential feature of English (only personal pronouns and pronouns with a case mark). A correspondence between these pronouns can sometimes be observed: there is also the agreement between pronouns and precursors in sex. Examples of this can be found in English (although English pronouns mainly follow natural sex and not grammatical sex): in this example, the copied non-prefix is the initial line of the „river“ head. The very irregular verb is the only verb with more coherence than this one in the contemporary form.

The difficult cases of the subject verb chord are described below in numbers. The nouns that can be a problem for language learners in terms of number match (for example. B, sheep, deer, fish, silver, planes, HQ, statistics, mumps) are described in irregular plurals in the letter section. In Scandinavian languages, adjectives (both attribute and predictive) are rejected based on the sex, number and determination of the no bite they change. In Icelandic and Fedesian, unlike other Scandinavian languages, adjectives are also rejected after a grammatical affair. An agreement based on grammatical numbers can be made between verb and subject, as in the case of the grammatical person discussed above. In fact, the two categories are often mixed in conjugation patterns: there are specific forms of verbs for the first-person singular, the second plural, etc. A few examples: A question with whom or what takes a singular verb. A grammatical person-based chord is most often between the verb and the subject.

An example of English (I am against him) was given in the introduction to this article. The general principles of subject and predicate compliance are described in this paper.